This year may prove to be a pivotal time for science education in California, as schools enter the final stages of introducing the Next Generation Science Standards — the new K-12 science standards — and prepare for the first fully operational standardized tests in early 2019. We asked science educators and leaders what they’d like to see happen in 2018 in the world of science education.

Jill Grace, president of the California Science Teachers Association:

Here are a few things we’ve been simmering on as a state with respect to science and the Next Generation Science Standards:

First, we need dedicated support (and funding) to support high-quality professional learning for teachers to help support their growth, understanding and ability to implement the full vision NGSS. This would include moving forward with processes for districts to review and pilot instructional materials. In line with that, we need materials that meet this vision. For all of this to be successful, administrators need support and training to be able to help their teachers and move implementation forward.

Staff of the National Center for Science Education, a nonprofit that works to protect science education from ideological interference:

From Ann Reid, executive director:

I wish for all teachers to have access to the professional development they need to teach climate change confidently and accurately; our survey found that more than 67 percent of middle and high school science teachers want and would benefit from such professional development.

While I’m at it, I’d like science teachers to have the resources they need to provide state of the art inquiry-based learning, including laboratory equipment and supplies, data analysis tools, field trip expenses, and professional development, especially as they implement the Next Generation Science Standards.

 

Click here to read the full story in Ed Source (January 11, 2018)

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